Wednesday, December 26, 2012

kandis



kandis - (kan-dis; Palaweño seasoning) [n.] sun-dried batuan fruit \sun-dried slices of batuan fruit

also spelled as candes in Palaweño [Cuyonon]

The name kandis is derived from the name of a far-flung place called sitio Kandis of Brgy. Bacungan in Puerto Princesa City of Palawan where the process of sun-drying sliced batuan fruits originated. The fruits are sourced from the forest of Palawan, though some are grown now in the farm


Pieces of kandis from the public market of Puerto Princesa City, Palawan.
  In Puerto princesa City, the batuan fruits are sliced lengthwise into long strips, seeds removed, and have it dried immediately under the intense heat of the sun. 
 

Pieces of kandis from the public market of Roxas, Palawan.
The Cuyonons of Palawan copied the process but had the fruit sliced crosswise thinly making the sliced pieces to look as circular. 

Packs of kandis being sold in the public market of Roxas, Palawan.
Palaweños had the idea of sun-drying the batuan fruit to have a year-round supply of this popular Visayan souring agent, as batuan fruit is seasonal and is abundant only in summer. A stock of kandis has a shelf life of more than a year. 


Packs of kandis being sold in the public market of Roxas, Palawan.
 When mold appears after several months of storage, kandis can be washed clean by rubbing the pieces together in plain freshwater, rinsed then sun-dried again. Like fresh batuan fruit, kandis (or candes) is used to sour the soup of tinola (boiled fish a la sinigang), laswa, lauya, linaga, and other soupy meat and vegetable dishes 

Packs of kandis being sold in the public market of Puerto Princesa City, Palawan
It is suggested to wash clean kandis before using in cooking and add it in the dish only when cooking is about to finish as it has the tendency to emit a hint of bitterness when boiled over a long time or when overcooked



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