October 13, 2018

puso (sweetened rice)



puso - (pu-sô; Hiligaynon [Capizeño of Panay, Capiz] snack; dw Tag. puso [heart]) [n.sweetened glutinous rice in woven nipa palm balls.


This puso is wrapped in woven young palm of nipa in a chisel-like style called tinigib, one of the most difficult styles of weaving palm balls. This kind of puso can only be found now in Panay, Capiz and is now being promoted by the local tourism industry of Capiz. When in Panay, drop by at the Holy Grounds Coffee Shop, just across the Santa Monica church in the proper of Pueblo, Panay, Capiz.

The hulled glutinous rice is cooked in freshly gathered tuba sang nipa (nipa palm toddy) until the toddy turned syrupy, thick, and the rice would become like biko, sticky and sweet.


This puso of Panay is sold by pair. Each pair comes with a plastic bag of latik na tuba (nipa palm syrup).

This is an old native delicacy of Panay, Capiz. To serve, the puso is cut into halves and the sweet rice inside is poured with latik na tuba (nipa palm syrup) before scooping it out. Best served with coffee.


The puso of Panay is wrapped in woven young leaves of nipa palm. It is served with latik na tuba (nipa palm syrup).

This delicacy can only be found now in the municipality of Panay, Capiz. It is being promoted now by the local tourism office of Capiz.

The latik na tuba (nipa palm syrup) is poured over the puso right before you scoop it out to eat it.

When in Panay, drop by at the Holy Grounds Coffee Shop, just across the Santa Monica church in the proper of Pueblo, Panay, Capiz.



It is served with nipa palm syrup (latik na tuba). You may find this similar to the patupat of Pangasinan. Yes, it is closely similar, only that the Pangasinense's patupat are cooked in bennal or sugar cane syrup. 


The puso of Panay town in Capiz is not like the kind of puso we can find in other parts of Visayas and Mindanao. 

The puso of Cebuanos are made with plain ordinary rice cooked in woven coconut palm into Visayan kan-on or the Tagalog kanin.


 puso (plain rice)







pastil







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