August 26, 2017

lipote



lipote – (li-pó-te; Bicolano, Quezonian [Quezon province], and southern Luzon [including Tagalog] fruit) [n.] lipote tree and its fruit (sc.name: Sysygium polycephaloides or Syzygium curranii).

a.k.a. igot or bahag in Tagalog and Bicolano
baligang in Bicolano [Albayano]
malig-ang in Bicolano [Camarines Norte]
amhi in Bicolano [Camarines sur]
igot in Waray [Samareño) 


A species of Java plum. Lipote is a fruit tree that is indigenous to the Philippines and can be found growing in Bicol region and few in some places in the southern part of Luzon that includes Metro Manila, Batangas, Laguna, Marinduque, and in Eastern Visayas that includes Samar.


The tree grows up to 9-meters or more and bears round, dark red to black fruits that looks like that of duhat, but is rounder and has no seeds. Hence, it is often called as a seedless duhat by those who do not know its local name.

The fruits are borne in compact clusters, each fruit is about 20mm in diameter and would become darker as it ripen. The ripest is black or very dark in color and has a rather dry but of pleasant acid flavor. It is eaten ripe and raw.

When grown outside the Bicolandia, the fruits have the tendency to be more acidic or sourish in taste. 


Locals would collect the ripe fruits, mash and put them in a sealed container with some salt and sugar added inside. The container is juggled hard enough to squeeze the juice from the fruits. The extracted blood-red juice is collected and taken as a refreshing juice drink. The pure extract can be stored in a jar and will keep for weeks. It can be serve cold by adding lots of ice. Some says that it tastes the hint of duhat but more like that of a mangoosteen, with a peculiar tart-sweet and tannin taste.


The pure juice extract can be fermented to make wine, or mixed as flavoring with lambanog (coconut vodka) and other beverages.

Be careful not to stain the dress or cloth with the dark red juice as it is very tough to remove. It could even stain the fingers and tongue. 


 
The fruits can also be preserved in the form of candies, compote, jelly or jam.

It can also be used in making pickles and fruit pies.

The fruit is believed to have a high antioxidant content and is also good for treating hypertension, diabetes or high sugar level in the blood.

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August 25, 2017

angkak

angkak – (ang-kàk; Tagalog and Capampangan food coloring; dw Chin. Hokkien an khak [reddish leaves used in fermentation] < an [red] + khak [shell or husk]) [n.] red yeast rice (sc.name: Monascus purpureus)

I found this angkak rice in the public market of Cabanatuan City, Nueva Ecija last July 2017.

Angkak is a Mandarin orange food coloring. A Chinese tangerine food coloring obtained from a plant with reddish leaves, or of rice treated with species of red mold. 

This angkak rice is priced at PHP320.00 a kilo when I found it in the public market of Cabanatuan City, Nueva Ecija last July 2017.

It is not for cooking into kanin (boiled or steamed rice), but can be added in cooking rice as food color. 

The Capampangans, Bulaqueños, Novo Ecijanos, and Tagalogs are fond of using angkak in coloring burong isda (fermented cooked rice with fresh fillet of freshwater fish, i.e. tilapia, bangus, ayungin, etc.), and in bagoong alamang (shrimp paste, a.k.a. balaw-balaw).

Angkak rice.
Angkak produces bright to pastel pink color, a classic food coloring that is now fast disappearing because of artificial instant food coloring.

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August 13, 2017

balot itlog manok

balot iltog manok - (ba-lót it-log ma-nòk; Cebuano delicacy) A new variation of Filipino balut egg that is made with brownish Caber chicken egg.

a.k.a. balot in Cebuano
balut itlog manok in Tagalog and other dialects



This 16-day old balot itlog manok looks more gruesome than its predecessor duck egg balut. It has more feathers with fully developed legs, head, and beak. 



It started to appear in Cebu City some time in 2012.

Along with the penoy itlog manok or pinoy, this Visayan balot is now gaining fast popularity in Visayas and in some places in Mindanao. It even reached Lucena City in Quezon province and in Bambang, Manila, probably brought and introduced by the Visayans who moved to settle in Quezon province and in Metro Manila. 

Recently, I found it on the sidewalk of Alabang viaduct and on Montillano Street in Muntinlupa City.


This Visayan "balot" is more gruesome compared to its predecessor duck egg balut. It has more hairs (feathers) and the legs, head, and beak of the chick appear to be prominently developed already. 


It tastes quite similar to duck egg balut, but the bones are a bit tougher and the hairs are nasty. Next time you dare a foreigner to eat balut, offer this Visayan BALOT instead. Let's see how far we can scare them. hahaha!


By the way, do not dare to offer this to our Muslim brethren because a nasty and gruesome food like this is considered unclean (Haram) according to Islamic laws. Besides, living animals has to be slaughtered in a manner that it has to bleed. Otherwise, you are insulting them.



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pinoy Bisaya


pinoy -  (pi-nóy; Cebuano delicacy) A variation of Filipino "penoy" boiled egg that is made with of brownish Caber chicken eggs.
a.k.a. pinoy in Cebuano
penoy itlog manok and pinoy Bisaya in Tagalog and other dialects


For the past 5 years now, it is now gaining popularity in Visayas, particularly in downtown district of Cebu City, such as in Carbon Public Market, Fuente Osmeña, and Taboan.


It can also be found now in Iloilo City and Bacolod, as well as in Cagayan de oro City of Misamis Oriental (Mindanao). Also in Tacloban City, Lucena City (Quezon), Silay City (Negros), and sometimes even in Bambang (Manila) and Alabang (Muntinlupa). 

The Visayan PINOY and BALOT eggs are getting more popular than its predecesssor, the duck egg penoy.

It tastes quite similar to ordinary boiled chicken egg, no bad smell.

A dipping sauce of spiced up vinegar, and sprinkled with or pressed on rock salt, a zest is added into it.



Similar to balut penoy, opinions as to whether or not pinoy is Haram (forbidden) in Islamic law differ from various schools of thought

It is unclear if this unfertilized egg is just similar to a fresh chicken egg that can be taken as food.  

There are those who would say that considering the chick and its blood are not yet formed in the egg. Thus, pinoy and/or penoy can be taken as food, because only those living animals that are not killed without slaughtering and their blood were not shed are considered Haram. 

To be safe, it is advisable to ask first if that Muslim would gladly accept pinoy egg.


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A wealth of information about Pinoy foods, etymology, history, nutrition, how to cook it, culinary tips, how it is served and eaten,  how it is called in other dialects, and more...

kalintubo


kalintubo - (ka-lin--bo; Maguindanaon meal) [n.] A Maguindanaon budget meal, similar to pastil or paster, that is made with freshly steamed rice (i.e., steaming hot plain rice) and topped with chicken cutlets stir-fried with soy sauce, or saucy chicken liver cooked adobo-style, then wrapped in banana leaf folded into a conic shape making it to look like a small volcano - open on top. 

A Maguindanaon elder demonstrating how to prepare kalintubo topped with saucy chicken liver.
Kalintubo topped with chicken cutlets stir-fried with soy sauce.
The opening on top allows the hot rice to cool off without trapping the moisture. Thus, preventing the meal from spoiling fast. It also makes one easy to tell what topping is on the kalintubo. The sight of it makes the meal attractive as well.

The opening can also be made narrow for easy handling when on the go.
You can eat the kalintubo meal either using your fingers, provided you wash your hands first, or with spoon and fork. The banana leaf would serve enough as dining plate, though most would prefer to serve and dine kalintubo on plate.
Kalintubo is often taken with a hard-boiled chicken egg as siding pair to rice
Kalintubo topped with chicken cutlets stir-fried with soy sauce.
Kalintubo topped with saucy chicken liver cooked adobo-style



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