Friday, December 17, 2010

tagaktak


a.k.a. tinagaktak in Cebuano
amik in Davao del Sur
lukot-lukot in Chavacano [Zamboangueño]
tinagtag in Maguindanaon
tiyatug or tiyanug in Maranao
ja in Suluanon, Joloanon & Ta’u-sug


tagaktak (ta-gák-tak; Cebuano snack) [n.] rice fritter


A triangular net-like snack of ground sticky rice batter mixed with coconut milk, beaten chicken egg, and sugar. Its looks like a curly fried pancit bihon but of fine and crisp strands. To make it even crispier, kamote (sweet potato) flour is added into the batter.

Tagaktak being sold on sidewalk stalls across the entrance gate of Basilica Minore del Sto Niño de Cebu (a.k.a. Sto Niño Church) in Cebu City.

Its net-like strands is created using coconut shell with small perforations similar to a water sprinkler. It is positioned directly over a pan with oil heated over a medium fire. The rice batter is poured into the shell and pass through the small holes like string of noodles falling directly into the pan that immediately got fried upon contact with the boiling oil. The coco shell is swayed in crisscrossing or circular motion to create a net-like pattern of fritter on the pan.



Its net-like strands is created using coconut shell with small perforations similar to a water sprinkler. It is positioned directly over a pan with oil heated over a medium fire. The rice batter is poured into the shell and pass through the small holes like string of noodles falling directly into the pan that immediately got fried upon contact with the boiling oil. The coco shell is swayed in crisscrossing or circular motion to create a net-like pattern of fritter on the pan.


The fritter is then folded into half and then folded further into triangular shape as if folding a flag. It is then turned over and fried until golden reddish brown and crisp. The cooked tagaktak is taken out, drained of excess oil, and served with a lining of banana leaf or wrapped in plastic cellophane bag.


The name tagaktak is from the Cebuano word tagak, which means “to drop,” and its derivative word tagaktak would mean “continuously dropping” with reference to the rice batter falling out from the perforated coco shell. If coconut shell is not available, empty milk can be devised as a replacement simply by boring small holes through its bottom by hammering a 2-inch nail through it. A long handle can be attached to the shell or can so as to avoid from getting hurt from the spattering hot oil and steam from the pan.


This snack is prepared and looks similar to the ja in Sulu or the tiyanug of Maranao, only that they are pliable and rolled into tubular shapes, unlike the triangular tagaktak that is very crisp and would easily breaks and fall off.


These pieces of tagaktak are manufactured in Mandaue City and sold on sidewalk stalls near the Nuestra Señora Virgen de Regla church in Poblacion, Lapulapu City, Mactan island, Cebu.


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