Wednesday, April 29, 2015

curacha

canduyon in Surigaonon (Surigao City, Surigao del norte)
ipis dagat in Batangueño (northern part of Batangas) 
ipis in Zambaleno (Sambal of Zambales)
kusimay in Ilocano 
bawa in Ta'u-sug

curacha – (ku-rát-tsa; Zamboanga and Sulu sea crab, seafood; dw Span. cucaracha [cockroach]) [n.] spanner crab (sc.name: Ranina ranina) \red frog crab

Curacha crabs being sold at Shopwise supermarket in Festival Mall, Alabang at PHP589.00 a kilogram 

A deep-sea crab with orange to red colored shell even when uncooked.

In the Philippines, this crab is used to be known endemic to the seas of Zamboanga del Sur and Sulu sea, but my research and later discoveries disproved this contention. Similar or closely-related species are also found in other parts of Mindanao, Visayas (particularly in the Pacific side), and the northeastern part of Luzon, though scarce and hardly seen or caught. Some species are also found abounding in the coasts of Hawaii and Australia.


So called curacha, from Spanish cucaracha, which means  "cockroach," because this crustacean looks like a huge cockroach. The shell is almost goblet-shaped, with average size about the size of a human palm. Some are twice as big as the average ones. It has hairy short bristles on the edges, has a pair of large pincers on the sides that extend toward the front, has three sets of legs, two of which are attached on a segmented hard-shelled tail similar to that of lobster but shorter.


It is more of shells than meat, but is highly sought for its delectable taste.

Unlike most crabs, such as the alimasag and the alimango that walks sideward,  curacha can only moves forward and backward.

The biggest ones are priced at PHP689.00 a kilogram in Shopwise supermarket of Festival Mall, Alabang, Muntinlupa City.


My Personal Notes:

Many years back, I thought this crab was named after a classic dance with fancy moves. I thought the crab would just move like that or it would be you doing the dancing steps after dining it or when you're pinched by this crab. I was wrong.

I tried also to look for it in the public market of Zamboanga City in my few travels in Zamboanga peninsula but could hardly find it there these last few years.  If I only knew that I could easily find it in the supermarket, a few hundred meters away from my work place here in Metro Manila, I would not look for this crab that far.    



For more about Pinoy foods, see also my OPEN & FREE food dictionary.


A wealth of information about Pinoy foods, etymology, history, nutrition, how to cook it, culinary tips, how it is served and eaten,  how it is called in other dialects, and more...

Sunday, April 26, 2015

pakbol


pakbol - (pak-bol; Maranao snack) [n.] cassava coated deep-fried saba banana


The cassava tuber is peeled, grated, squeezed out of its juice, then pressed between palms and molded flat then a piece of peeled semi-ripe saba banana is placed on the center and the cassava is rolled to coat the banana, then deep fried to cook.

When serving, pakbol is pressed and rolled on white or brown sugar.




For more about Pinoy foods, see also my OPEN & FREE food dictionary.



With valuable information, etymology, history, nutrition, how to cook it, culinary tips, how it is called in other dialects, and more...

biyaki


biyaki (bi-ya-kî; Maranao snack) [n.] steamed cassava with young corn



The cassava roots are peeled, grated, pounded, mixed with grated young corn kernels and sugar.


A scoop of the mixture is rolled in banana leaf (or cornhusk) then folded on both ends, forming a rectangular thick packet. 

The packets are then boiled in a pot half-filled with water for about an hour or until biyaki is cooked





For more about Pinoy foods, see also my OPEN & FREE food dictionary.



With valuable information, etymology, history, nutrition, how to cook it, culinary tips, how it is called in other dialects, and more...

daludal

takway in Negrense, Capizeño, & Tagalog
pusaw in Maranao

I found this heap of takway being sold along the sidewalk of Silay City public market in one of my travels in the province of Negros Occidental.
daludal – (da-lú-dal; Ilocano vegetable) [n.] taro stem; The stalk of young taro shoot, referred to as the Philippine native asparagus

A vendor cleaning some takways she is selling at Silay City public market during one of my travels in the province of Negros Occidental.

It is the newly sprouting stalk of gabi (taro) that is slender and its fresh young leaf still unrolled. Daludal is harvested and cooked into a variety of vegetable dishes, much like that of Ilocano aba.

Bundles of daludal in Santiago City Isabela public market

In Negros and Panay islands where it is called takway, it is often boiled then seasoned with suka (vinegar) and asin (salt) or included in making Ilonggo laswa (boiled assorted vegetables). 

The stalks can also be cooked with coconut milk to become ginataan or made into adobo by simmering the cutlets in vinegar and soy sauce with or without sagpaw or sahog.

The peeled takway. Just wash them clean and they are ready for cooking


For more about Pinoy foods, see also my OPEN & FREE food dictionary.



With valuable information, etymology, history, nutrition, how to cook it, culinary tips, how it is called in other dialects, and more...

Follow my blog now via email:

CLICK HERE to get Philippine Food Illustrated delivered by email. No spam, promise.

or copy this address to get latest update:

SEE ALSO EDGIE'S FORBIDDEN PAGES

SEE THIS OPEN & FREE food dictionary now:

SEE MORE PHOTOS AND READ MY BLOGS HERE

Help Me Now

  • any amount with your Pay Pal or card.

Your contribution will help fund Edgie Polistico's research and development of Pinoy dictionaries. More discoveries, information, and knowledge will be shared to you and to others because of your generosity.

CLICK HERE on how else to help this project