Sunday, November 1, 2015

dugyan


Dugyan (photo credit to The Philippine Star)
dugyan - (dug-yan; Palaweño fruit) [n.] red durian (sc.name: Durio graveolens)

Unlike the usually cultivated durians of Mindanao, the fruit of dugyan is smaller in size, weighing less than a kilogram with sharper and longer spikes on its thick coat. It is yellow-green when unripe and turns bright yellow to yellow-orange when ripe. 

The Durio graveolens of Palawan (photo credit to Lindsay Gasik's blog, Year of the Durian)

When fully ripe, it opens while on the tree, showing its distinct bright red lipstick flesh that would eventually fall to the ground. 

With its distinct lipstick red flesh, the dugyan, an endemic fruit in Palawan, is said to be an entirely different species from the typically-cultivated durian that we see in the market. The smell and taste is not repulsive and nauseating. It is almost creamy, but not so sweet. 

In the Philippines, this rare variety of durian is found only in Palawan though similar other red durian varieties can also be found in Borneo, Malaysia, and Thailand 


Dr. Virgilio Loquias, the durian expert of the Philippine's Bureau of Plant Industries, holding a red durian of Palawan during Lindsay Gasik's search for durians in the country. (photo credit to Lindsay Gasik's blog, Year of the Durian)

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Saturday, June 6, 2015

tindok


tindok - (tin-dok; Cebuano fruit) [n.] a giant plantain (sc.name: Musa paradisiaca var. magna).
a.k.a. tandok in Cebuano
tenduk or tunduk  in Teduray, Lambangian, Dulangan, and Manobo

We found these few pieces of tindok banana in the grocery section of SM Makati in Ayala Center of Makati City way back in 2009.

A very long and large variety of cooking banana fruit.

Its digit is about a foot long or more or about the size of a man's arm. Elongated and commonly a bit curved in form with thick green banana peel.

The length and size of this banana are even more than that of Margette's arm.
Yes, the one she is holding weighs more than a kilo, and it is priced quite expensive in 2009.The stickers says it is from Dole, a clue that  most likely this came from Mindanao.

The tindok plant bears a bunch of fruit that only has around three clusters with about a dozen of digits in each cluster.

This banana is rich in potassium and only good when cooked. It can also be broiled or made into fried chips.

I found the following photos in FB and they are worth sharing:

A trunk of tindok with a bunch of giant fruits - photo credit to Aveen Acuna-Gulo's FB account
This one is captioned with "Per Datu Leticio Datuwata, some fruits grow to be 4 inches  in diameter (photo by 9gag)- photo credit to Aveen Acuna-Gulo's FB account
A pile of tindok at the Bagsakan, Valencia Public Market, Valencia City, Bukidnon - photo credit to Aveen Acuna-Gulo's FB account
A bunch of tindok by Child Andrade Peteros of Hindang, Leyte - photo credit to Child Andrade Peteros' FB account 


Personal notes:

Tindok is not a giant lakatan.  Jiggy Manicad of Unang Balita (GMA News Online) mistook tindok as giant lakatan in his June 5, 2015 news report "Puno ng saging sa Bulacan, nagbunga ng 'giant lakatan




Related post:
Freaky bananas that baffled local news media and agriculturists




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kinilaw nga sasing


kinilaw nga sasing – (ki-ni-law nga sa-sing; Cebuano, Boholano, Davaoeño [southeastern Mindanao] and Misamis occidental [northern Mindanao] and Romblomanon dish) [n.] a raw dish of peanut worm in spiced up vinegar.
a.k.a. kinilaw nga saypo in Boholano and Surigaonon
kinilaw na tasing in Cantilangnon (Cantilan, Surigao del sur)

The inverted sasing worms. So called "peanut worm" in English, because its texture resembles that of empty peanut shell.
To prepare, the peanut worm is washed clean then inverted inside out by pushing a bamboo stick from one end and through inside the body so as to clean its muddy contents. 

The inverted worms are washed again thoroughly on seawater, drained and then seasoned with vinegar spiced up with chopped onions, ginger, sili (chili), and salt to taste.

The ingredients of kinilaw nga sasing in Pagadian City, Zamboanga del sur. It uses sukang tuba (commonly sold in plastic tubes), luy-a, sibuyas pula, siling kulikot, calamansi, biyasong, and tabon-tabon fruit  
In southern Mindanao, such as in Pagadian City and other coastal towns in Zamboanga del sur where tabon-tabon (sc.name: Hydrophytune orbiculatum) is plenty, the said fruit is used to seasoned the kinilaw nga sasing

Extract of scraped tabon-tabon fruit and extracted juice of calamansi and biyasong lime make the kinilaw nga sasing  more delectable.

The kernel of tabon-tabon fruit is scraped off, mixed with little amount of vinegar then squeezed and the extract is mixed in the dish. It is even made more delectable by adding calamansi juice and extracted juice of native lime called biyasong.

Adding vetsin (MSG) is optional, but not recommended.


A young Maguindanaon couple residing near the sea of Pagadian City, Zamboanga del sur prepares kinilaw nga sasing.

Sasing is an exotic delicacy and considered as an aphrodisiac by the locals. It is leathery tough but crunchy. It has to be chewed well to savor its true flavor.

Kinilaw na sasing is highly sought as an exotic pulutan (food served in drinking session) in coastal villages of Visayas and Mindanao. It is a perfect pair for tuba (coconut wine) or ginebra (gin).


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sasing


sasing – (sa-sing; Cebuano, Boholano, Davaoeño [southeastern Mindanao] and Misamis occidental [northern Mindanao], Waray, and Romblomanon worm/seafood) [n.] peanut worm (sc.name: Sipunculus nudus).
a.k.a. saypo in Boholano & Cebuano
saypo in Surigaonon
tasing in Cantilangnon (Cantilan, Surigao del sur)


A sand worm or sand burrower of the family Echiurus that burrows under sandy clayish soil of the sea shore.

Sasing burrows in moist sandy-muddy ground along the shore and river deltas.  A hole like this is a sign that peanut worm is just around beneath the sand.

It is an exotic delicacy to some Pinoys. It is often eaten as kinilaw nga sasing where its cylindrical body is inverted inside out and cleaned of its content by washing on seawater. The cleaned inverted  skin is then dipped in spiced vinegar and munched.



It has a crunchy leathery texture and has to be chewed well to savor its flavor. 

THESE WORMS LOOK FAMILIAR 
 My sasing video clip in YouTube

It is considered as an exotic delicacy and as an aphrodisiac by some Pinoys.


So called peanut worm in English because when inverted, the skin of this exotic worm would look like empty peanut shell. 

The worms are washed clean then inverted inside out by pushing a bamboo stick from one end and through inside the body so as to clean its muddy contents. The inverted worms are washed again thoroughly on seawater, drained and then seasoned with spiced up vinegar to become an exotic dish called kinilaw nga sasing

Although sasing lives and feeds in the sandy mud, some Filipino Muslim does not consider this as unclean or filth to be among those forbidden (Haram) in Islamic Laws. Nevertheless, this exotic worm should be served with caution to Muslim or any follower of Islamic faith, so as not to offend or insult them


Related posts:

Personal notes

I read a news report that some residents of Inopacan, Leyte province believe that sasing has curative powers against tuberculosis and anemia. Click HERE for that GMA Network news:


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Wednesday, April 29, 2015

curacha

Curacha crabs being sold at Shopwise supermarket in Festival Mall, Alabang at PHP589.00 a kilogram 
curacha – (ku-rát-tsa; Zamboanga and Sulu sea crab, seafood; dw Span. cucaracha [cockroach]) [n.] spanner crab (sc.name: Ranina ranina) \red frog crab.
canduyon in Surigaonon (Surigao City, Surigao del norte)
ipis dagat in Batangueño (northern part of Batangas) 
ipis in Zambaleno (Sambal of Zambales)
kusimay in Ilocano 
bawa in Ta'u-sug
A deep-sea crab with orange to red colored shell even when uncooked.
In the Philippines, this crab is used to be known endemic to the seas of Zamboanga del Sur and Sulu sea, but my research and later discoveries disproved this contention. Similar or closely-related species are also found in other parts of Mindanao, Visayas (particularly in the Pacific side), and the northeastern part of Luzon, though scarce and hardly seen or caught. Some species are also found abounding in the coasts of Hawaii and Australia.


So called curacha, from Spanish cucaracha, which means  "cockroach," because this crustacean looks like a huge cockroach. The shell is almost goblet-shaped, with average size about the size of a human palm. Some are twice as big as the average ones. It has hairy short bristles on the edges, has a pair of large pincers on the sides that extend toward the front, has three sets of legs, two of which are attached on a segmented hard-shelled tail similar to that of lobster but shorter.


It is more of shells than meat, but is highly sought for its delectable taste.

Unlike most crabs, such as the alimasag and the alimango that walks sideward,  curacha can only moves forward and backward.

The biggest ones are priced at PHP689.00 a kilogram in Shopwise supermarket of Festival Mall, Alabang, Muntinlupa City.


My Personal Notes:

Many years back, I thought this crab was named after a classic dance with fancy moves. I thought the crab would just move like that or it would be you doing the dancing steps after dining it or when you're pinched by this crab. I was wrong.

I tried also to look for it in the public market of Zamboanga City in my few travels in Zamboanga peninsula but could hardly find it there these last few years.  If I only knew that I could easily find it in the supermarket, a few hundred meters away from my work place here in Metro Manila, I would not look for this crab that far.    



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Sunday, April 26, 2015

pakbol


pakbol - (pak-bol; Maranao snack) [n.] cassava coated deep-fried saba banana


The cassava tuber is peeled, grated, squeezed out of its juice, then pressed between palms and molded flat then a piece of peeled semi-ripe saba banana is placed on the center and the cassava is rolled to coat the banana, then deep fried to cook.

When serving, pakbol is pressed and rolled on white or brown sugar.




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