Saturday, November 1, 2014

duck egg casserole

a.k.a. balut casserole in Tagalog

These balut eggs are out in their shells and into another shells - the glass bottles
duck egg casserole - (dak eg ka-se-ról; Tagalog dish) [n.] shelled balut eggs cooked in casserole, usually as a soupy or saucy dish, such as the balut caldereta, balut afritada, balut a la pobre, adobo, brined, etc.

Balut eggs can also be served in several ways. When peeled of its shell, it can be cooked in tomato sauce to become balut caldereta or balut afritada, in soup like the balut a la pobre, cooked adobo-style, or into paste or spread for bread, as in balut pate.

Bottled duck egg casserole is a perfect way to bring balut as pasalubong for Pinoys and friends abroad.

Bottled duck egg casserole cooked in many ways and in varied flavors are on display in the grocery section of Market-Market Supermarket in Bonifacio Global City (BGC), Taguig City. It can also be found in other select big supermarkets and groceries in Metro Manila.


Latest innovation in balut is the bottled duck egg casserole in several variants, such as caldereta, afritada, and the least flavored is the one boiled and preserved in brine solution.

These bottled balut eggs are now available in select big supermarket in the Philippines. They are perhaps available in Pinoy or any Asian grocery stores abroad.

Or make one yourself at home.

To know more about balut eggs, click here.

For more about Pinoy foods, see also my OPEN & FREE food dictionary.


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Sunday, October 12, 2014

wild chili ale

a.k.a. chili beer in Tagalog

 
wild chili ale  (wayld tsi-li a-le; Tagalog alcoholic beverage; dw Eng. wild + chili + ale)  [n.] a chili-flavored craft beer.

Craft beers are those that are manufactured in craft brewery (a.k.a. microbrewery) which is a brewery that produces a small amount of beer.

Craft beer in the country actually uses imported grains (barley, hop, etc) for brewing.  However, the wild chili are sourced locally that may include our very own intensely hot siling labuyo (Philippine bird's eye chili).  Other ingredients, such as sugar, yeast, and water can also be sourced locally.

The label suggests you serve this beer better with those familiar Pinoy delicacies.  
A bottle of Bicol Express Wild Chili Ale being served for sampling during the McKinley Hill Beer Festival at the Venice Piazza in McKinley Hill, Bonifacio Global City (BGC), Taguig City. Other craft beers are the (+63), a single hop IPA beer that represents Philippines using the Philippine international telephone country code +63, and the Poto Pale Ale. All three craft beers are manufactured by the Great Island Craft Brewery in Parañaque City, Metro Manila.

For more about Pinoy foods, see also my OPEN & FREE food dictionary.



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Saturday, September 27, 2014

chicharon buchi

also spelled as tsitsaron butse in Tagalog 
a.k.a. butse, butse chicharon, butseron or buchiron in Tagalog

A serving of chicharon buchi with a dipping of sukang Iloko from a participating food stall during the launching of Mercato Centrale's Mezza Norte in Trinoma, Quezon City last May 3, 2013.
chicharon buchi  (tsi-tsa-rón but-tsé; Tagalog delicacy; dw Span. buche [crop])  [n.] crisp fried chicken crop

Buchi is the Tagalog word for the chicken crop or craw of fowls and other birds. It is the small pouch-like gullet of fowls and birds, a part of the esophagus where freshly swallowed food are temporarily stored for later digestion in the gizzard or for regurgitation as when feeding the nestlings.

It is also in the butse that swallowed food is lightly fermented or softened by gland secretions before it passes through the gizzard for grinding. 

Pinoys would collect butse, clean it thoroughly then deep fry to become chicharon also known in Tagalog by the same name, butse or chicharon buchi.

Because you can harvest only one butse for each chicken, you need to kill several dozens of chicken to get a small heap of this another Pinoy favorite pulutan. The mass production of fast growing chickens now provides ample supply of chicken crops as another by-product to chicken meat. Pinoys transformed this what used to be a waste and dirty offal into a tasty and sought street food in the country.

Chicharon buchi  is also called butse, butseron or buchiron in Tagalog. Butseron is the short name for butse chicharon, (likewise, buchiron is from buchi chicharon) with the chicken crop usually split open or cut lengthwise into halves and fried till crisp.  



For more about Pinoy foods, see also my OPEN & FREE food dictionary.




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Sunday, May 18, 2014

snake wine

snake wine - (es-nek wayn; Cebuano and Tagalog wine) [n.] a wine soaked with snake.

A freshly killed snake, complete with its skin, scales, flesh, bones, and internal organs, is steeped in wine, usually gin, until the juice from the body of the snake partly become the flavor of the wine. 

The authentic "Cobra Energy Drink." Unlike the commercially bottled cobra energy drink, this snake wine will not cause you to worry of becoming diabetic being this potent drink is sugarless. Here, you will get the real cobra inside the container, not just a drawing on the bottle.

Snake wine is taken as a potent drink and believed to have some medicinal benefits, adds vitality, energy, and boasts one’s sexual appetite or as an aphrodisiac.

A snake wine of Philippine king cobra called banakon in Cebuano or ulupong in Tagalog, and the slender Cebuano snake called iliw. Both snakes are known to be extremely venomous

The kind of snake often used in making this wine is highly poisonous like the Philippine king cobra (Naja philippinensis) called banakon in Cebuano or ulupong in Tagalog, and the Cebuano iliw

Other than the hinebra (gin), the vodka, lambanog (Philippine coconut vodka), anisado (anise wine), and rice wine can also be used as base wine for this potent alcoholic wine.
I spotted this street vendor peddling a bottle of snake wine on the sidewalk of Ormoc City.  He uses local gin labeled as Mallorca as base wine for this potent alcoholic drink. 
To convince that it is safe to drink this wine, he takes a shot of it.
The wine later on warms his body and this man said it would keep him active the whole day

For more about Pinoy foods, see also my OPEN & FREE food dictionary


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Sunday, May 11, 2014

buti-buti


buti-buti (bu-ti bu-tî; Cuyunon [Palaweño] snack) [n.] native poprice.

The ampao (poprice) of Cuyo, Palawan.

It is made with dehulled but unpolished native rice, usually with red or brown colored bran. 

The grains are pan-roasted till they popped and become like pop-corn.

Caramelized muscovado sugar is then added and mixed in the poprice as sweetener and binder and the caramel-coated poprice is molded by hands into small balls, about the size of a golf ball

I found these packs of buti-buti in the stall of Pastor Abad in the public market of Roxas, Palawan. I thought the balls were crumbled popcorn. But when I took a closer look, I noticed the popping big kernels of rice. I couldn't believe that there is such kind of rice in the country with kernels that big.
Unlike the popcorn, this native poprice is quite dense and the outer layer of popped kernel are leathery that it needs a lot of chewing to fully masticate it into a pulp and only then that you can savor the true taste of buti-buti.


These balls of buti-buti are delicate to handle. It sticks to your finger and easily crumbles when pressed between fingers or even when poked, as shown in the next photos.  
I got this authentic product of Cuyo, Palawan just a hour after its arrival from Cuyo island.  It would take almost two days to transport this buti-buti to Roxas, Palawan from the small island of Cuyo off the eastern sea of mainland Palawan where it can only be found. 
The native rice variety used in making this buti-buti is an heirloom rice of Cuyo, Palawan.  It is seasonal and available depending on when there is a harvest or available stock. This explains why the small pack of buti-buti I bought cost much. I kept on wondering how the rice subsists in the small island. 

For more about Pinoy foods, see also my OPEN & FREE food dictionary.

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