Friday, February 18, 2011

ensaimada

Also spelled as ensaimada in almost all Pinoy dialects


ensaymada – (en-say-má-da; Spanish origin; dw Span. ensaimada <>ensaimades) [n.] spiral soft cheese bun.


Originally in Majorca, Spain, this was made with flour, water, sugar, eggs, flour dough and pork lard called saim thus it is called ensaimada

But the Pinoy version is made with butter instead of pork lard, and several variants of ensyamada are now being baked and sold here in the Philippines that includes: ham ensaymada, ube ensaymada, mongo ensaymada, ensaymada Malolos, and the all-time-favorite cheese ensaymada



It is still a soft dough bread that is spiral in shape that wound towards the center, often glazed with melted butter or margarine and lightly sprinkled with (or rolled in) refined white sugar and topped with grated cheese. 

Enhanced variations have strips of ham, macapuno strings or ube (purple yam) jam. The Bulakeños started making before World War II their large version of ensaymadas topped with lots of grated cheese and thin slices of salted egg.


Some Batangueños migrated and brought their baking expertise to Mindoro. These ensaymadas in Roxas, Oriental Mindoro came from a Batangueño bakery in town. 
Almost all bakeries in Metro Manila are selling ensaymadas. Thsese ones are from a bakery in Apitong, Brgy. Cembo, Makati City.

These are the ensaimadas of Red Ribbon bakeshop in Metro Manila.

 

Saturday, February 12, 2011

potato rib

(a.k.a. potato twist, twistix or chipstix in Tagalog)
 
potato rib  (po-te-to rib) [n.] potato twist stick. A spirally sliced potato fries in stick. The whole piece of unpeeled potato is sliced spirally thin continuously from end to end, then skewered in pointed-end bamboo stick and deep fried till crisp.

This could be the modified version of twister fries or its progenitor, the French fries.

It is served with a sprinkle of finely ground salt or a dipping sauce, such as catsup or mayonnaise. It also has a variety of flavor that includes cheese, sour cream, BBQ, pizza, ketsup, sweet and spicy, etc.

potato ribs freshly cooked at a food stall in the ground floor of SM Supermarket in Makati City



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Friday, February 11, 2011

walkman

a.k.a. taenga or tenga ng baboy BBQ in Tagalog



walkman (wok'-man; Tagalog BBQ) [n.] pig's ear barbecue. The pig's ear is shaven well and the outer skin scrapped off (a process often done while the slaughtered pig is still at the abattoir). The cleaned ears are then sliced into bite-size and soaked in marinade for at least 1 hour or allowed to stand overnight in the refrigerator. The marinade could be a simple solution of vinegar, soy sauce, pounded peppercorn and cloves of garlic. The flavor could be enhanced by adding some muscovado or brown sugar, calamansi (Philippine round lime) extract and laurel leaf. The marinaded ears are then skewered in sharp-pointed bamboo stick, then grilled over red-hot charcoal embers, occasionally turned over and basted with basting sauce, oil, or with the remaining marinade, until the barbecue are seared.

This pig's ear BBQ got its colloquial name “walkman” after the skewered marinated sliced ear was alluded to the handy cassette tape player of the same name paired with a set of earphones that was manufactured and popularized by Sony Corp. It was when Sony’s walkman became a fad that this BBQ was introduced in the streets of Metro Manila.



tenga BBQ of Victoria's Grille available at the Mercato Centrale on weekends from morning to past noon at the Bonifacio High Street parking area in Bonifacio Global City (The Fort), Taguig City.


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Tip: To help soften the meat of the BBQ, add the marinade with few drops of extracted juice from pounded ginger roots or the extracted whitish resin that comes out from the skin of pricked fresh green papaya fruit. These extracts can also be used in stewing or braising hard-to-cook meats.
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Thursday, February 10, 2011

igat (dried and fried)

igat (i-gat; Tagalog, Pampangueño (Capampangan), Pangasinense, Ilocano, Maranao and Maguindanao sea fish) [n.] Sun-dried sea eel. 

In Pangasinan, sea eel is made into tuyo (dried fish). The igat fish is cleaned of its gills and viscera, immersed in brine solution then sundried. 

When dry, it is cut into pieces (about 2 inches long) and is often sold in its cutlet form. Dried igat is known by Pangasinenses to be "pampatigas ng tuhod" (potent). 

It can be fried, grilled, or used as sahog in vegetable dishes.

See also igat 


Above, are dried igat (sea eel) sold at the roadside stalls in Brgy. Damortis, Sto. Tomas, Pangasinan.

Below,when dried igats are fried



espada (dried)

  
Dried espada fish sold at the roadside stalls in Brgy. Damortis, Sto. Tomas, Pangasinan

dilis (deboned and dried)

Boneless dried dilis sold along the roadside stalls in Brgy. Damortis, Sto. Tomas, Pangasinan.

Pinoys are fond of calling deboned fish or meat  as boneless. It is actually a misnomer to call this fish "boneless" because all kinds of dilis (anchovy) have bones. 

The fish is however deboned and decapitated when processed into dried dilis. Thus, it should be called deboned dried dilis.

Boneless dried dilis sold along the roadside stalls in Brgy. Damortis, Sto. Tomas, Pangasinan.

For more about Pinoy foods, see also my OPEN & FREE food dictionary.


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danggit bulad


danggit bulad (dáng-git bu-làd; Visayan dried fish) [n.] sun-dried butterflied rabbit fish.  

To make a sun-dried danggit, an adult rabbit fish is cut into butterfly-shaped fillet by slicing from the back of its head down to the tail fin and leaving the abdomen side intact. 

All the internal organs are removed and the fillet washed clean, then it is soaked in briny water, drained, and air-dried under the heat of the sun till parched and stiff. 


Dried danggit is cooked by frying or grilling shortly on low to medium heat as it would easily get burned. It is crisp and crunchy like chicharon (cracker) when cooked. 

Dried danggit sold on stalls along the roadside of Damortis, Pangasinan.


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pakwan shake

 
pakwan shake (pak-wan sheyk) [n.] watermelon shake

This could be made from the juicy pulp of fresh, ripe watermelon fruit or from the artificially flavored powder ingredient. 

The watermelon fruit is sliced and the pulp is scooped out from the fruit's thick skin and put into the blender (if powdered artificial ingredient is used instead of fresh fruit, a scoop of this powder is poured into the blender). 

Chunks of cracked ice or pieces of cubed ice are then added into the blender and then processed till the pulp and ice become very fine in texture. 

Some milk (fresh or powder) is added to give the shake its creamy taste. Moderate amount of refined white sugar is also added to give more sweetness to this cold refreshment. 

The pakwan shake is then poured in tumbler and served with a sipping straw, and sometimes garnished with a miniature paper umbrella, specially when served during summer or hot seasons, at the poolside or at the beach resort.

pakwan shake from a restaurant in Urdaneta City, Pangasinan.


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custard cake


Custard cakes on display in a bakery in Guadalupe Nuevo, Makati City


basi

basi - (bá-si; Ilocano wine) [n.] sugarcane wine; A  native Ilocano wine made from fermented sugarcane juice, particularly those produced in Central and Northern Luzon. This wine is processed in burnay (Ilocano earthen jar).



Basi wines sold along the roadside stalls in Binalonan, Pangasinan using recycled bottles and plastic containers (gallons)
 


The extracted juice of sugarcane is distilled and stored in the jar to ferment with a locally made yeast, such as bubod, to become wine. 


Locals would classify their basi into either basing lalaki or basing babae

The basing lalaki tastes dry, potently strong, and has high content of alcohol. While the basing babae tastes rather sweet and has lesser alcoholic content.





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