Monday, January 24, 2011

siling labuyo

a.k.a. siling bundok or siling palay in Tagalog
siling kulikot in Cebuano
sili katumbal in Ilonggo
mimis or siling diablo in Ilocano
sili napet in Itawis
katumba or lara in Tausug
luya tiduk in Maranao


The siling kulikot in the Carbon Public Market of Cebu City

siling labuyo - (si-ling la-bu-yò; Tagalog spicy condiment/seasoning) [n.] Philippine bird’s eye chili (sc.name: Capsicum frutescens, [Linn.]). A species of wild native hot small chili pepper or tiny hot chili that grows in the forested areas of the country, though it can be grown also in the garden, backyard, or pots.

The  Ta'u-sug katumba  or lara sold in the Public Market of Zamboanga City

This species of Philippine tiny wild chili pepper is also known as the “bird’s eye hot pepper” known to grow only in the Philippine archipelago. So called siling labuyo because it is picked by wandering wild chickens called labuyo by the Tagalogs. The siling labuyo plant bears tiny fruits refuted to be one of the hottest peppers in the world.   

The kind of siling kulikot sold in the Carbon Public Market of Cebu City. This is the same as the original Tagalog siling labuyo.

Authentic siling labuyo is very small, very short (less than an inch) with a not-so-pointed tip.  

Some imported and less spicy hot chilies are passed on as siling labuyo in the market or grocery stores when in fact it is not a siling labuyo like the siling Taiwan that is more than an inch long and very pointed.

The mimis of Ilocos Sur province

This tiny chili is known for its intense piquancy - so small in size, yet so hot in taste. 

Despite its irritating piquancy, chickens and birds are picking the ripe mimis in the wilds, as if it is their favorite. 

The mimis of Ilocos Sur province

Ilocanos would use mimis as flavor in making spicy hot sukang Iloko (sugarcane vinegar). They also used it as condiment in some dishes and dippings

Some bottles of sukang Iloko in Binalonan, Pangasinan are steeped with mimis.
Siling Taiwan being sold in the public market of Cabanatuan City. It is commonly found also in public markets and groceries in Metro Manila, often passed on as siling labuyo, when in fact it is not a siling labuyo.
Siling Taiwan being sold in the Alabang public market of Muntinlupa City

For more about Pinoy foods, see also my OPEN & FREE food dictionary.


With valuable information, etymology, history, nutrition, how to cook it, culinary tips, how it is called in other dialects, and more...



wheat pandesal

wheat pandesal (wit pán-de-sal; dw Eng. Wheat + Span pan de sal [bread with salt]) [n.] a loaf of pandesal that uses whole wheat brown flour as the main ingredient.

Processed wheat flour is added to adjust consistency of bread.

The dough used in baking this bread also uses shortening, yeast, and of course the salt.



The wheat pandesal of Pan de Manila bakeshop in Metro Manila and some cities in Luzon

Hawaiian split

Hawaiian split  (ha-wá-yan sh-plit; dw a Pacific island Hawaii + Eng split [sliced toppings]) [n.] a loaf of choco-brown bread topped with sliced or tidbits of ripe pineapple, sliced ham, grated cheese and overlaid with streaks of mayonnaise. 

The name is probably influenced by the American dessert “banana split” wherein the toppings has been modified making it to appear like a Hawaiian baked goodie by topping with pineapples sans a scoop of ice-cream, rather replaced with mayonnaise.


The Hawaiian split of Suize Cottage bakeshop in Metro Manila.




All photos by Edgie Polistico
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED




Thursday, January 20, 2011

penoy

a.k.a. balut penoy in Tagalog

penoy (pé-noy; Tagalog [Metro Manilan, Lagueño and Bulaqueño), Batangueño, Cebuano, Boholano, Waray, Ilonggo, Bicolano, Ilocano, Pangasinense, and Capampanganegg/delica; dw Tag. balut [wrap] + pino [fine] > Pinoy [Filipino]) [n.] duck egg that remains unfertilized after undergoing the incubation period; This    unfertilized duck egg has no yolk formation when screened through in the candling process or that procedure where each eggs is held against a lighted candle (old method) or electric bulb (modern method).

The unfertilized eggs are segrated as the by-product in the production of balut sa puti then kept warm in rice husk for several days before they are sold as hardboiled egg.

Instead of having a semi-fully developed chick, penoy egg would only produce a mass of plain white and yellow embryo. Thus, when boiled, the white portion would solidify and the yellow mass would just coagulate.

There are two kinds of boiled balut penoy: the masabáw (soupy) and the tuyô (dry).

The masabaw is produced by keeping duck eggs in rice hay or incubating them up to 12 to 13 days. When boiled, masabaw is not actually soupy but rather very moist, creamy and a bit slimy that can be slurped readily after having sprinkled with a pinch of salt or doused with spiced up vinegar.

When incubated further for a day or more, the penoy egg would become tuyô or quite dry and appeared to be like an ordinary boiled chicken egg only that the white and yellow part of the embryo are not holding any regular shape, sometimes it appears semi-scrambled.

Penoy egg would become tuyô or quite dry and appeared to be like an ordinary boiled chicken egg only that the white and yellow part of the embryo are not holding any regular shape, sometimes it appears semi-scrambled.

To easily distinguish masabaw from tuyo, vendors would put a distinguishing mark on the shell of balut penoy. For the masabaw, a straight vertical line is drawn around the shell, or sometimes letter “S” is written for sabaw (soup) or “M” for masabaw (soupy). A crosswise or spherical line is drawn around the egg to indicate that balut penoy is tuyô.

A douse of vinegar and sprinkle of salt are the usual condiments used when eating balut penoy.

Due to limited supply of duck eggs, a commercially produced brown chicken egg are now fast becoming a substitute in making balut penoy and is called itlog manok penoy.

However, there are mischievous balut penoy makers who would pass on white chicken egg as brown chicken egg by putting light brown artificial coloring on the shells of white chicken eggs, such as dipping in coffee
Photo shows balut penoy sold on the stall of a sidewalk vendor under the viaduct in Alabang, Mutinlupa City. The eggs with no markings are balut sa puti. Shown also in the photo is a bottle of spiced vinegar and container that holds grains of salt. Vinegar and salt are the usual condiments used when eating balut

Crossing spherical line or a line drawn across around the egg would indicate that these penoy eggs are tuyo.
A straight vertical lines are drawn for the masabaw. Sometimes, letter “S” is written, which stands for "sabaw"
A bucket of shelled penoy readied by a night vendor under the pedestrian overpass along Zapote Road in Alabang, Muntinlupa City. These would be dipped in orange-color batter, then deep fried to become kwik-kiwk.
Opinions as to whether or not penoy is Haram (forbidden) in Islamic law differ from various schools of thought

It is unclear if this unfertilized egg is just similar to a fresh chicken egg that can be taken as food.  

There are those who would say that considering the chick and its blood are not yet formed in the egg, penoy can be taken as food, because only those animals that are not killed without slaughtering and their blood are considered Haram. 

To be safe, it is advisable to ask first if the person whom the penoy egg would be served would accept it gladly

For more about Pinoy foods, see also my OPEN & FREE food dictionary


Try also my OPEN & FREE food dictionary:

With valuable information, etymology, history, nutrition, how to cook it, culinary tips, how it is called in other dialects, and more...

 

daing na bangus

daing na bangus (da-ing na ba-ngús; Tagalog preserved) [n.] marinated butterflied milkfish. 

The milkfish is butterflied and its viscera and gills are completely removed. The butterflied fish is then washed clean in water, drained and steeped in marinating sauce made with vinegar and soy sauce with minced garlic (for added flavor, laurel leaf, peppercorn and/or small amount of brown sugar maybe added). 

For best result, allow the marinating sauce to steep in the fish for at least 12 hours in the refrigerator. 

For even distribution of the marinating sauce into the fish, pack and seal the marinated fish in thick plastic cellophane wrapper. 

Daing na bangus can also be made dry by spreading open the marinated butterflied fish (with the skin side underneath) on a wire mesh, bilao (bamboo tray), or bamboo stick matting, and air dry it under the heat of direct sunlight.
Dried daing na bangus sold along the roadside stalls and street peddlers in Damortis, Santo Tomas, Pangasinan
To cook, daing na bangus is simply fried in any cooking oil till crisp brown. It is served with a side dip of vinegar with crushed garlic, or soy sauce with squeezed calamansi juice (Philippine round lime extract), and the optional whole piece of siling labuyo (bird’s eye chili). Sometimes, it is paired with the siding of ensaladang papaya.


tiyolo

tiyolo (ti-yo-lô; Maranao condiment) [n.] roasted mixture of grated coconut meat and brown sugar. The freshly grated coconut meat is pan-roasted till lightly browned and aromatic, then pounded in mortar into tiny bits.  Brown sugar is added towards the end of pounding. Tiyolo is often used as aromatic flavoring in tapay and other Maranao snacks and dishes.





All photos by Edgie Polistico
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED




Monday, January 17, 2011

danggit flower

danggit flower (dáng-git flá-wer; Pangasinense dried fish) [n.] dried danggit (rabbit fish) arranged like a starflower. 

The danggit fish is scaled, its gills and viscera completely removed, then washed clean and butterflied (the side of fillet with no bones is detached and set aside for use in making another version of dried danggit - a sheet of dried danggit fillet). 

The splits of danggit fish are immersed shortly in brine solution and then laid flat on screen wire (mesh) or bamboo stick mat, neatly arranged as if the overlapping petals of flower. 

It is then dried under the heat of direct sunlight. 

When completely dried, the splits of danggit fish would stick together to hold its shape resembling a starflower.
Danggit flowers sold along the roadside (highway) stalls of Damortis in Santo Tomas, Pangasinan
To cook, danggit flower is fried, turned over, and done when it is crisp brown.


It is served with sliced tomatoes and dipping of sukang Iloko (Ilocano sugarcane vinegar) or baak (aged sukang Iloko) with crushed or minced garlic.



For more about Pinoy foods, see also my OPEN & FREE food dictionary.



With valuable information, etymology, history, nutrition, how to cook it, culinary tips, how it is called in other dialects, and more...

Saturday, January 15, 2011

baak


baak (bá-ak; Ilocano and Pangasinense condiment) [n.] aged sukang iloko (Ilocano sugarcane vinegar), fermented for at least one year. The process of making baak in Ilocos region would include brewing of extracted juice of sugarcane before it is stored in the burnay (Ilocano big earthern jar). A locally prepared yeast is added to allow fermentation. In Pangasinan, baak is not necessarily brewed. The sugarcane extract is fermented naturally in the burnay.

Baak vinegar sold along the roadside in Binalonan, Pangasinan

When baak is less than one year, it is yellow-orange in color with fruity sourness. When aged over one year or more, it becomes dark in color and is very very sour.





All photos by Edgie Polistico
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED



Follow my blog now via email:

CLICK HERE to get Philippine Food Illustrated delivered by email. No spam, promise.

or copy this address to get latest update:

SEE ALSO EDGIE'S FORBIDDEN PAGES

SEE THIS OPEN & FREE food dictionary now:

SEE MORE PHOTOS AND READ MY BLOGS HERE

Help Me Now

  • any amount with your Pay Pal or card.

Your contribution will help fund Edgie Polistico's research and development of Pinoy dictionaries. More discoveries, information, and knowledge will be shared to you and to others because of your generosity.

CLICK HERE on how else to help this project